Posts Tagged ‘Wisconsin’

8th August
2012
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Ryan should be Mitt Romney’s choice for Vice President.  He is smart, energetic, attractive, clean background, and knows how to campaign to swing voters.  His current Congressional district is largely blue collar union members in Wisconsin.

Ryan would immediately inject some enthusiasm among the base of the party since he is a solid conservative.  It will also inject some message discipline because Ryan is one of the best communicators in the GOP.

The most important reason to pick Ryan is that if the Democrats are going to attack Romney for the “Ryan budget,” who better to argue that issue than the author himself?  Make no mistake, the Democrats are going to tie Romney to Ryan’s budget regardless of whether he’s on the ticket.

Another asset Ryan brings to the ticket is the “real person” element.  He is a very personable and engaging guy who can talk to real people about anything.  He does regular town halls, dealing with real people day in and day out.

Oh, and Ryan on the ticket would probably deliver Wisconsin to the Republican column in the Electoral College – something that hasn’t happened since Reagan.

That changes the map, which would change Obama’s math.

The real question is whether Romney will have the guts to go bold.

 

5th June
2012
written by Sean Noble

This says it all.

#DoYouRecall

5th June
2012
written by Sean Noble

This piece by Daily Caller contributor, Thomas Grier, hits tonights Walker landslide victory on the nose.

If you pause and listen carefully, you might be able to hear the despair coming from Jim Messina, President Obama’s 2012 campaign manager, and David Axelrod, Obama’s top strategist and communications director, as the meaning of Wisconsin’s recall election becomes clear.

In the final hours before Governor Scott Walker’s victory, with the writing on the wall, President Obama and his campaign could only muster a tweet and a last-minute video for challenger Tom Barrett. But do not let that tepid support fool you: Democrats and their union allies spent an astronomical amount on a judicial election, four state legislative recalls and the recall of Governor Walker, only to lose.

The spin has already begun. On Tuesday, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said the Wisconsin recall election “probably won’t tell us much about a future race.” Regardless of what you hear, the results are a colossal failure for Democrats and President Obama’s re-election efforts. Even former Pennsylvania governor and Democratic National Committee chairman Ed Rendell, speaking on MSNBC last week, said the recall election was a “mistake.”

Read the whole thing.  And then watch the spin for the next few days.

5th June
2012
written by Sean Noble

(This post will be updated throughout the night)

“Republicans are playing dirty.”

“Democrats are trying to steal the election.”

“Exit polls show virtual tie.”

“Exit polls show more union households turning out.”

“Exit polls show more older voters.”

Quote after quote, line after line – it is what makes up modern day reporting of politics.

I’m not a fan of exit polls – in part, because they are usually wrong – but also because when exit polls are reported hours before the polls close, I think it could have an impact on turnout, and that just seems wrong.

There is a LOT riding on the results tonight, and based on what Democrats are saying, there is an expectation that Scott Walker will remain as Governor. Even the White House is downplaying the importance of the election.

More to come…

 

[UPDATE – 8:00 p.m. EDT]

One hour to go and more news out of Wisconsin that does nothing to add clarity to the election picture.  Places like liberal Madison could have more than 100% turnout, because of same-day registration.  Exit poll analysis remains a completely mixed bag, but there are nuggets which both sides cling to.

Most are predicting a close election and a long night.  I still think it’s going to be a wider than expected, but I’m in the distinct minority with that opinion.

Time will tell.

[UPDATED – 8:12 p.m. EDT]

This live stream from Huffington Post is epic: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/05/wisconsin-recall-election-2012_n_1569607.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003

[UPDATED – 9:40 p.m. EDT]

With 12% reporting, Walker leads by nearly 20 points.  It will certainly tighten, but this looks to be a double digit Walker win.

[UPDATED – 10:00 p.m. EDT]

Walker has won the Wisconsin recall. With 25% reporting, Walker leads by 20 points…

In a word… wow!

5th June
2012
written by Sean Noble

Today is election day in Wisconsin for the recall of Governor Scott Walker.

If the good people of Wisconsin think like the folks in this ad, it’s going to be Walker by double digits.

This is a fascinating approach to a unique situation:

3rd June
2012
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

 

 

If you follow politics at all, you know that Wisconsin has been the epicenter of the battle between Left and Right for more than a year.

It all started after the 2010 elections when Wisconsin went from blue to red in dramatic fashion with Republicans defeating Democrats in the U.S. Senate seat, the Governor’s seat, both houses of the legislature, and two Congressional districts.

In early 2011, newly elected Governor, Scott Walker, proposed a “budget repair bill” to address the fiscal mess he inherited (sound familiar?).  Rather than passing even more government spending to “stimulate” Wisconsin’s economy, Walker proposed real budget cuts, reforms to public employee union benefits (asking them to pay a little bit more for their health care and retirement, but not as much as the average private sector employee) and collective bargaining reforms (although he exempted police and fire fighters).

The response?  A dozen Democrat legislators literally left the state and hid out in Illinois to prevent a quorum; public employee union members – mostly teachers – staged massive protests at the state capital day in and day out, with doctors volunteering to write them “sick notes” to prevent taking a loss of pay.  (One has to wonder what type of hypocrisy must be employed by teachers who question students’ sick notes after that.)

After weeks of these circus antics, legislative leadership figured out a way to pass the Walker legislation even while Democrat legislators were shirking their responsibility (but still cashing their per diem checks) out of state.

This led to “outrage” and the Left was going to send a message by defeating Supreme Court Justice Prosser, who was up for re-election in April, because then they could challenge Walker’s policies up to the Supreme Court and overturn his right-wing agenda.

But a funny thing happened on the way to the Supreme Court race.  Prosser won.

Undeterred, the unions and their minions decided that they would recall four state senators and recapture the State Senate and block Walker’s radical agenda.

But, alas, they failed again, and did not recall the requisite number of Senators to give the Democrats the majority.

So they turned their guns to the big dog – Scott Walker – to send a message to all Republican Governors across the land: you mess with the unions, you get the horns.

Well, we’ll see how that turns out for them on Tuesday.  If I were a betting man, I’d say that Walker wins by near double-digits and Wisconsin becomes a major battleground state for the Presidential election.

Think about that. Wisconsin.  The birthplace of modern-day American liberalism.

God does love America.

 

8th May
2012
written by Sean Noble

Tuesday was the primary election for the recall of Governor Scott Walker.  Democrats fielded four candidates and Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett prevailed.  There was a “challenger” to Governor Walker, a “protest” primary candidate who received a whopping 3% of the vote.

The problem for Democrats is that the combined total of votes cast (with 92.4% reporting) in the Republican primary was 589,176 and the combined total in the Democrat primary (with the same 92.4% reporting) was… 585, 888.

Think about that.  Democrats had a robust primary campaign between Barrett and Cathleen Falk, but Walker had no real competition, and more ballots were cast in the Republican primary than the Democrat primary.

That does not bode well for Democrats going into the June 5 general election for the recall.

Prediction: Gov. Walker wins the recall, further minimizing union power in Wisconsin and putting Wisconsin in play for both the Presidential election and the U.S. Senate election.

 

3rd April
2012
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Maryland primary has already been called for Mitt Romney.  D.C. is expected to go with Romney, as will Wisconsin.

Rick Santorum is out of reasons to stay in this race.  Gingrich isn’t even worth wasting time on.

[UPADTE]

Romney has won huge in D.C. and will have a strong win in Wisconsin.  The fat lady continues to sing.

[UPDATE]

We now have the biggest break in the primary election season – the next elections aren’t until April 24, and full three weeks.  Yes, Santorum leads in Pennsylvania, but what’s the point?  Assuming Santorum can maintain his lead there, which is a big assumption, Romney will win Connecticut, Delaware, New York and Rhode Island.

 

 

23rd January
2012
written by Sean Noble

This is a great newspaper editorial cartoon. When you actually look at the reforms Gov. Scott Walker proposed in Wisconsin last year, and then compare that to the reaction from the public employee unions and Democrat legislators – union members occupying the State Capital, and Democrat legislators fleeing to Illinois.

Anyway, this made me laugh out loud.

5th May
2010
written by Sean Noble

What must be the world’s longest (and largest) spending spree is coming to an end.  Politicos everywhere were abuzz this afternoon following Representative David Obey’s (D-WI) surprise announcement of his plans to retire at the end of this Congress. Elected in 1969 (he’s been in Congress longer than I’ve been alive, and it feels really nice to say that), Obey won all but two of his 21 elections with more than 60% of the vote (1969, in his first election, and in 1994, the year of the Republican Revolution and, importantly, when the political environment was very similar to today’s).

While the 71 year-old Chairman of the powerful House Appropriations Committee asserted during his announcement that being “bone tired” was one of the primary motivations in making his decision (Hey, who can blame him? All those taxpayer dollars don’t spend themselves!), it no doubt deals a huge blow to House Democrats as they already face an uphill battle to November.

Will Obey’s move inspire other Dems to follow suit? How ugly will the fight for the Approps gavel get? Today’s events leave many a question mark, but it can safely be said that Republican Sean Duffy, who was already waging a fierce battle against Mr. Obey, is having a pretty great Wednesday.