Posts Tagged ‘Ronald Reagan’

6th February
2015
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

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(picture courtesy of Dr. Fred Vidal)

A rehash of previous years – and it’s ever more relevant: 

On this day, 102 years ago, God made Ronald Reagan – ok, so He made him before that, but you get the point.  Reagan was a blessing to America, becoming President at the very time that his country needed him.  If there was ever a time we needed another Reagan, it is now.

Reagan embodied a concept of America very different than our current President. In his final address to the nation from the Oval office he spoke of the success of America as an example of freedom.

“I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don’t know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it. But in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still.”

Happy birthday President Reagan. We miss you, we need you.

 

 

11th December
2014
written by Sean Noble

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The Arizona Republic published a piece I wrote about the Arizona Governor’s race.  Here it is in it’s entirety:

 

Doug Ducey is a blueprint for the GOP

Sean Noble, AZ I See It

 

Sean Noble: Doug Ducey stood FOR something, and voters responded to his agenda.

 

Plenty of those taking office in January got there simply by not being a Democrat in a Republican year. If the GOP is to prevail in 2016, they’ll need more.

 

Doug Ducey’s successful gubernatorial campaign in Arizona provides the blueprint for Republicans going forward.

 

When conservatives pine for “the next Ronald Reagan,” they are really talking about leadership. They want someone who articulates a vision, who can build a broad, diverse coalition, and who fights for conservative principles rather than conservative politics.

 

Arizona has found such a leader in former Cold Stone Creamery CEO Doug Ducey, an energetic, optimistic businessman who was fond of saying, “I built a business, now I want to shrink a government and grow an economy.” Ducey is a man of action; he’ll do what he says he’ll do.

 

And what is that? He’ll make changes to education funding so that more dollars make it to the classroom, rather than bloated administrations.

 

He’ll reduce the waiting lists for high-performing schools so that low-income kids can have access to the best education possible.

He’ll end the practice of government picking winners and losers and lower individual and corporate income taxes so that Arizona attracts new business.

 

And he’ll provide leadership that all Arizonans — and conservatives — can be proud of.

 

Doug Ducey stood for something; voters cast their ballots in support of his agenda rather than against the Democratic agenda. Ducey ran an effective campaign by building a broad coalition, staying on message and clearly articulating a platform of opportunity, which resonated with Arizonans.

 

American Encore commissioned Kellyanne Conway of the Polling Company, Inc. and Women Trend to conduct a post-election poll. Conway’s findings show Ducey won big on substance.

 

Education was a clear priority for voters (35 percent), with the economy next (32 percent) followed by border security (13 percent) and health care/”Obamacare” (12 percent).

 

When it came to education, 65 percent of women and 62 percent of men said it was important to their vote that Ducey supported scholarship programs to give low-income children access to high-performing schools.

 

By making it clear that education mattered to him and delivering a strong message of support for school choice, Ducey neutralized Fred DuVal’s negative messaging that Ducey didn’t care about education. This among other factors led to a remarkable result: Ducey beat DuVal among women.

 

The Democratic “war on women” playbook just fell flat with voters. When asked about the most important issues in casting their vote for governor, 1 percent cited women’s issues and another 1 percent cited abortion.

 

In fact, Fred DuVal is the first Democratic candidate to fumble the abortion issue. He took the extreme position that parents should not have to consent in order for their 14 year-old daughter to get an abortion. Fifty-nine percent of voters cited that position as important to their vote.

 

Other typical liberal rhetoric like class warfare and climate change failed to move Arizona voters. Only 1 percent of voters cited income inequality as important, and less than 1 percent cited climate change.

Oh, and for all the media squawking about “dark money”? Exactly one respondent out of 500 thought it important.

 

Doug Ducey attracted a broad range of support. In addition to winning among women, he won 24 percent of the Hispanic vote and only slightly trailed DuVal among young voters, while enjoying a 25-point advantage with 45- to 54-year-olds and leading big among those 55 and older.

 

Of course, the national environment had some impact on the race: Only 37 percent of voters had a favorable opinion of President Barack Obama, and 57 percent had an unfavorable opinion.

 

But the environment doesn’t explain the 12-point margin of victory for Ducey. On Election Day, Ducey enjoyed a 50 vs. 31 percent favorable/unfavorable rating, compared with DuVal at 38 vs. 35 percent favorable/unfavorable rating. That had a huge impact on late deciding voters — of which there were more than usual. A whopping 23 percent made up their mind in the last two weeks of the election.

 

The late Steve Shadegg, one of the premiere election experts in modern history, said that, ultimately, elections come down to whom you can trust. If you explain your positions eloquently and honestly, as Doug Ducey did, people will trust you — even if they don’t agree with you on every issue. Ducey provided Republicans with the perfect campaign blueprint; next, he’ll show them how to govern.

 

Sean Noble is the president of American Encore.

30th April
2014
written by Sean Noble

This was originally posted at AmericanEncore.org

At colleges and universities across the country there are designated “free speech zones.”  College administrators limit political speech and activity to one area.  As Virginia Postrel explains:

A “free speech zone” is a tiny portion of campus, usually far away from the main thoroughfares, where students are allowed to hand out leaflets or hold protests and rallies only after they have filed the proper paperwork and given plenty of notice.

Designating a limited “free speech zone” does much more than keep noisy demonstrations away from quiet study spaces. It’s a way of squelching spontaneous action or immediate responses to controversial news. Free speech zones, says FIRE president Greg Lukianoff, “teach students that speech should be contained by officials, controlled and feared, rather than celebrated, utilized and engaged.”

Putting aside the absurdity of free speech zones, it must be discussed how loosely some campuses define controversial or political speech. As this blognoted earlier this week, American values and knowledge of our freedoms have eroded because anti-American forces have been institutionalized.  Our schools, colleges, media and even some in our government are actively working against American ideals.

Last week we learned just how far we’ve come from Reagan’s call for “informed patriotism” when the University of Hawaii told a group of students that they weren’t allowed to hand out copies of the U.S. Constitution.  The college administrators explained their decision by saying:

The University policy [for events] says that RISOs [Registered Independent Student Organizations]can’t approach people. We run a diverse campus and people can feel intimidated and it’s like they [the students] can’t say no. We have a free speech zone for students to use and it’s between the theater and new student services building….

This isn’t really the 60’s anymore. People can’t really protest like that anymore, times have really changed since the movement back then…

Indeed, times have changed.  University of Hawaii administrators are acknowledging the rules of exercising our freedoms have changed, but are unrepentant about their role in it.  In the 1960s, students rightly protested unjust laws.  Today, students are barred from handing out copies of the supreme law of the U.S. on the rights of citizens and the responsibilities and limits of government.  Current campus rebels aren’t breaking the law, they’re educating fellow students about it!  What’s more, the administrators claim students can feel “intimidated” by those who are sharing a document that limits government and grants rights to U.S. citizens.

These students at the University of Hawaii and students across the country who are standing up to campus administrators give me hope in the resurgence of the defense of our freedoms.  I’m also grateful to organizations like the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) for representing students in their fight against college administrations.  It’s not just enough to support fellow Americans, we must also encourage them to continue speaking out and using the tools we have to ensure that they can always do so freely.

 

 

23rd April
2014
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Arizona Republic ran a lengthy story on the front page of a recent Sunday edition about the 1964 presidential campaign of conservative icon Barry Goldwater.

Here is the lede:

“Barry Goldwater’s insurgent presidential bid 50 years ago was a spectacular failure as a political campaign.”

What jolted me was the “50 years ago” phrase. 50 years! That’s nearly a lifetime. And yet his campaign was one of the most consequential efforts of the modern-day conservative movement. As George Will has quipped, “Goldwater won the election, it just took 16 years to count the votes,” in a nod to the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980.

It was Reagan’s epic speech “A Time For Choosing” that launched his national profile.

In that speech he said:

Not too long ago, two friends of mine were talking to a Cuban refugee, a businessman who had escaped from Castro, and in the midst of his story one of my friends turned to the other and said, “We don’t know how lucky we are.” And the Cuban stopped and said, “How lucky you are? I had someplace to escape to.” And in that sentence he told us the entire story. If we lose freedom here, there’s no place to escape to. This is the last stand on earth.

And this idea that government is beholden to the people, that it has no other source of power except the sovereign people, is still the newest and the most unique idea in all the long history of man’s relation to man.

This is the issue of this election: whether we believe in our capacity for self-government or whether we abandon the American revolution and confess that a little intellectual elite in a far-distant capitol can plan our lives for us better than we can plan them ourselves.

You and I are told increasingly we have to choose between a left or right. Well I’d like to suggest there is no such thing as a left or right. There’s only an up or down: [up] man’s old — old-aged dream, the ultimate in individual freedom consistent with law and order, or down to the ant heap of totalitarianism. And regardless of their sincerity, their humanitarian motives, those who would trade our freedom for security have embarked on this downward course.

***

You and I have the courage to say to our enemies, “There is a price we will not pay.” “There is a point beyond which they must not advance.” And this — this is the meaning in the phrase of Barry Goldwater’s “peace through strength.” Winston Churchill said, “The destiny of man is not measured by material computations. When great forces are on the move in the world, we learn we’re spirits — not animals.” And he said, “There’s something going on in time and space, and beyond time and space, which, whether we like it or not, spells duty.”

You and I have a rendezvous with destiny.

We’ll preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on earth, or we’ll sentence them to take the last step into a thousand years of darkness.

We will keep in mind and remember that Barry Goldwater has faith in us. He has faith that you and I have the ability and the dignity and the right to make our own decisions and determine our own destiny.

Thus, Goldwater’s loss was America’s, and the world’s, gain with the election of Reagan in 1980.

When you look back at Goldwater’s convention acceptance speech, at this moment in time it is downright prophetic:

Now, my fellow Americans, the tide has been running against freedom. Our people have followed false prophets. We must, and we shall, return to proven ways– not because they are old, but because they are true. We must, and we shall, set the tide running again in the cause of freedom. And this party, with its every action, every word, every breath, and every heartbeat, has but a single resolve, and that is freedom – freedom made orderly for this nation by our constitutional government; freedom under a government limited by laws of nature and of nature’s God; freedom – balanced so that liberty lacking order will not become the slavery of the prison cell; balanced so that liberty lacking order will not become the license of the mob and of the jungle.

Now, we Americans understand freedom. We have earned it, we have lived for it, and we have died for it. This Nation and its people are freedom’s model in a searching world. We can be freedom’s missionaries in a doubting world. But, ladies and gentlemen, first we must renew freedom’s mission in our own hearts and in our own homes.

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I know this freedom is not the fruit of every soil. I know that our own freedom was achieved through centuries, by unremitting efforts by brave and wise men. I know that the road to freedom is a long and a challenging road. I know also that some men may walk away from it, that some men resist challenge, accepting the false security of governmental paternalism.

And I pledge that the America I envision in the years ahead will extend its hand in health, in teaching and in cultivation, so that all new nations will be at least encouraged to go our way, so that they will not wander down the dark alleys of tyranny or to the dead-end streets of collectivism. My fellow Republicans, we do no man a service by hiding freedom’s light under a bushel of mistaken humility.

I seek an American proud of its past, proud of its ways, proud of its dreams, and determined actively to proclaim them. But our example to the world must, like charity, begin at home.

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I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.

The beauty of the very system we Republicans are pledged to restore and revitalize, the beauty of this Federal system of ours is in its reconciliation of diversity with unity. We must not see malice in honest differences of opinion, and no matter how great, so long as they are not inconsistent with the pledges we have given to each other in and through our Constitution. Our Republican cause is not to level out the world or make its people conform in computer regimented sameness. Our Republican cause is to free our people and light the way for liberty throughout the world.

Ours is a very human cause for very humane goals.

Arizona should be proud of producing the father of modern-day conservatism.  Barry Goldwater was a principled and stalwart defender of freedom every moment of his political career.  He saw the future of the conservative movement in Ronald Reagan, and it is now the time for conservatives to redouble our efforts to groom the conservative leaders of the future.

The future of our country depends on it.

6th February
2014
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(picture courtesy of Dr. Fred Vidal)

Last year, I posted what is below. It’s even more relevant today: 

On this day, 102 years ago, God made Ronald Reagan – ok, so He made him before that, but you get the point.  Reagan was a blessing to America, becoming President at the very time that his country needed him.  If there was ever a time we needed another Reagan, it is now.

Reagan embodied a concept of America very different than our current President. In his final address to the nation from the Oval office he spoke of the success of America as an example of freedom.

“I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don’t know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it. But in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still.”

Happy birthday President Reagan. We miss you, we need you.

 

8th April
2013
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It could’ve been the start of a joke: an actor from Hollywood, a Polish priest, and a British lady got together… Instead, it was the start of freedom’s greatest story.  With well-explained principles, well-executed ideas, and an unflagging belief in the human spirit, this trio peacefully ended the Cold War and brought freedom to millions.

Each added unique and complementary qualities to the group—kind of like the X-Men—creating an undefeatable force.  Pope John Paul II possessed quiet grace and Christ-like dedication to the less fortunate, Ronald Reagan sunny optimism and compelling leadership, and the Iron Lady, Margaret Thatcher, bold tenacity and intrepid force. (Imagine the dinner party they’ll have in Heaven tonight!)

They understood, and made it a popularly accepted truth, that freedom leads to prosperity because it allows human ingenuity, creativity, and aspiration—the human spirit—to thrive.  In light of this, they argued, government’s sole responsibility in the freedom-prosperity equation is to protect and defend freedom; not to provide freedom, God does that, and not to create prosperity, people do that.  In performing its role, government must treat people equally, not make them equal, as the current inhabitant of the White House would like to do.

Thatcher said, “We are all unequal. No one, thank heavens, is like anyone else, however much the Socialists may pretend otherwise.  We believe that everyone has the right to be unequal but to us every human being is equally important… Everyone must be allowed to develop the abilities he knows he has within him, and she knows she has within her, in the way they choose.”

Thatcher and Reagan eloquently explained the virtues of conservatism and the perils of liberalism/collectivism/socialism/communism.  Given the clear, obvious distinction, voters in both countries chose the conservative vision again and again.

Thatcher could delightfully dissect her opponents’ demagoguery with a clear-sighted wit.  Take for example this 1990 exchange between Margaret Thatcher and Simon Hughes, a Labour Party MP:

HUGHES: There is no doubt that the Prime Minister, in many ways, has achieved substantial success. There is one statistic, however, that I understand is not challenged, and that is that, during her 11 years as Prime Minister, the gap between the richest 10% and the poorest 10% in this country has widened substantially. At the end of her chapter of British politics, how can she say that she can justify the fact that many people in a constituency such as mine are relatively much poorer, much less well housed and much less well provided for than they were in 1979? Surely she accepts that that is not a record that she or any Prime Minister can be proud of.

THATCHER: People on all levels of income are better off than they were in 1979. The hon. Gentleman is saying that he would rather that the poor were poorer, provided that the rich were less rich. That way one will never create the wealth for better social services, as we have. What a policy. Yes, he would rather have the poor poorer, provided that the rich were less rich. That is the Liberal policy.

**It’s worth watching or reading the entire exchange.

I mourn her loss and I mourn the current absence of a conservative champion like her on the world stage.  Thankfully, with the nonstop coverage of her death and the many tributes to her, the Iron Lady can take one final swipe at the Left.  President Obama has argued for months that the rich must pay their “fair share” and the government must spend more, but today, millions will be reminded over and over again that, “the problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money.”

Thank you Margaret Thatcher.  The world is a better, freer place for your efforts.  Farewell, Iron Lady.

6th February
2013
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(picture courtesy of Dr. Fred Vidal)

 

On this day, 102 years ago, God made Ronald Reagan – ok, so He made him before that, but you get the point.  Reagan was a blessing to America, becoming President at the very time that his country needed him.  If there was ever a time we needed another Reagan, it is now.

Reagan embodied a concept of America very different than our current President. In his final address to the nation from the Oval office he spoke of the success of America as an example of freedom.

“I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don’t know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it. But in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still.”

Happy birthday President Reagan. We miss you, we need you.

 

3rd July
2012
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 4th of July is known for parades, rodeos, barbeques, sparklers and fireworks… in other words, a celebration. And it should be.

But think about the atmosphere in what became known as Independence Hall on that fateful day in 1776. This was a solemn assembly of great, established and successful men who were engaging in radical activity – revolting from an oppressive government and risking their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor in the process.

I have wondered if any of those men, as they lined up to sign what very well could be their own death warrant, hesitated or had second thoughts. I’d like to think that I would have been at the front of the line, but I have never been in any situation that is remotely similar, so who knows?

The one thing I do know is that I am eternally grateful for the courage and resolve of those great men, our Founding Fathers.

They weren’t perfect. Far from it. But they were the right men at the right time, fulfilling what I truly believe was implementing God’s will to establish a nation of freedom.

This is why we believe in American Exceptionalism. What other possible explanation is there for such a collection of great men in the right place (the colonies) at the right time (the 1770’s). I don’t think there is a time since then that we could replicate that collection of men.

They were creating a nation that would live up to John Winthrop’s vision of the “city on the hill” which would serve as an example of freedom to the rest of the world.

The best explanation of this vision comes from Ronald Reagan’s final address from the Oval Office on January 11, 1989:

The past few days when I’ve been at that window upstairs, I’ve thought a bit of the “shining city upon a hill.” The phrase comes from John Winthrop, who wrote it to describe the America he imagined. What he imagined was important because he was an early Pilgrim, an early freedom man. He journeyed here on what today we’d call a little wooden boat; and like the other Pilgrims, he was looking for a home that would be free. I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don’t know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it. But in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still.

Yes, this nation is the shining city on the hill and it is worthy of great celebration.

On this Independence Day, pause and offer a prayer of thanks to God for putting 56 men in a hot and stuffy room in Philadelphia in the summer of 1776 who, with quiet courage, made it all possible.

 

 

6th February
2012
written by Sean Noble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(picture courtesy of Dr. Fred Vidal)

[This is a modified post from 2010]

Today Ronald Reagan would have turned 101. If there was ever a time we needed another Reagan, it is now.

Reagan embodied a concept of America very different than our current President. In his final address to the nation from the Oval office he spoke of the success of America as an example of freedom.

“I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don’t know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it.But in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still.”

Happy birthday President Reagan. We miss you, we need you.

3rd July
2010
written by Sean Noble

“Isn’t our choice really not one of left or right, but of up or down? Down through the welfare state to statism, to more and more government largesse accompanied always by more government authority, less individual liberty, and ultimately, totalitarianism, always advanced as for our own good.  The alternative is the dream conceived by our Founding Fathers, up to the ultimate in individual freedom consistent with an orderly society.  We don’t celebrate dependence day on the Fourth of July.  We celebrate Independence Day.” –Ronald Reagan

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